Tag Archives: Hip Hop Culture

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Kamanchi Sly and Brothers to EMCEE at the BBOY Documents JAM with DJ JAZZY JAY LIVE FROM NY

bboy elements with jazzy jay

Ladies and gentleman, for B Boy Documents in 2014, we are honoured to present the legendary Jazzy Jay live and direct in London, NW6, on Saturday 18th October 2014.
Jazzy Jay….South Bronx, protege of Afrika Bambaata, Zulu Nation DJ, Jazzy Five, Jazzy Sensation, Planet Rock, Beat Street, Negril, The Roxy, Kiss FM, Def Jam, It’s Yours, Cold Chillin’ In The Spot, Strong City, Scratch…and THAT studio in the Bronx.

On the Wheels of Steel, alongside Jazzy Jay, we have DJ Fingers, DJ Devastate, Kid Dyno, Aidan Orange, Bunny Bread, and Def K.

Your Masters of Ceremonies for the evening will be Kamanchi Sly, Cool Cash C ( Supa Rock Down ), Jive Junior, Freshski, Emix ( Family Quest ), Dirty Harry ( Family Quest ), Crazy Noddy and Lyn-e-Lyn.

The warehouse venue for the night is:
131 – 179 Belsize Road, Kilburn, London, NW6 4AB
( car park 1st floor, corner of Abbey Road and Belsize Road )
Party times: 10pm until the early morning!
£5 on the door

All other info, please email: info@bboydocuments.com

http://bboydocuments.com/2014/10/03/bboy-documents-presents-the-legendary-jazzy-jay-live-direct-from-new-york-city/

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Kamanchi Sly says “Respect to all the True Hip Hop Heads!!!”

its just begun

Its been a few days since the passing of one of  the architects of Hip Hop Culture, Mr Jimmy Castor whose legendary anthem “Its just begun” set off a sonic backdrop to what has  become one of the world most important artforms. Hip Hop in all its forms from B-Boyin’ to emceeing, scratchin’ grafitti and poppin’ has become a global phenomenon, spreading across all of the worlds continents, uplifting youth culture wherever it has been met with open arms.   I first got into Hip Hop as an eleven year old, comin’ from a tough part of south london, growing up on a council estate.  The music and the dancin’ took over the imagination of me and my mates who all either became breakers in crews, grafitti writers, emcees or beatboxers. Being poor and with little funds it enabled a generation of  kids from poor families to find a way to express themselves without the need for spending much money. It gave us and identity, it was who we were. My mum thought i was crazy the way i jerked by body to crazy electro beats by Afrika Bambaataa, wearing trainers with fat laces, and a pair of ski goggles around my neck. After every summer we would return to school with a whole lotta new moves, battling anybody who would dare to step into the ring in the “electro-room” at lunchtimes..entry was 15 pence!!